Wellness Visits

Routine preventive visits not only help children grow up healthy, they also give parents and caregivers an opportunity to ask questions and receive advice on everyday health matters. At Worldwide Pediatrics, we believe that wellness visits are equally important as visits for sick children, which is why healthy children and families still receive our utmost attention and care.

Wellness Visit Overview by Age



 

2 Weeks

  • If you haven’t already, please bring copies of your birth records to this office visit. These papers tell us the results of physical exams and tests done during your baby’s first days in the hospital
  • Family medical history will be taken at this time to assess risk factors or establish treatment plans
  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference (related to brain growth) will be measured
  • A complete head-to-toe physical exam will be performed
  • Hepatitis B vaccination given if not given previously at hospital
  • Any questions about care, sleep, feeding, birthmarks, etc. will be answered

1 Month

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Umbilical cord/bellybutton checked to make sure area is healing well
  • Circumcision sites (if applicable) checked for proper healing
  • Hepatitis B vaccination given if not given previously at hospital or earlier visit
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Concerns such as newborn acne, cradle cap, colic or other issues addressed
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • sleep (2-3 hours at a time for around 15 hours total)
    • eating (every 2-3 hours)
    • diapers (6-8 wet and 1-3 dirty per day)
    • alertness (recognizes voices, does "tummy time", looks around)

2 Months

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • First round of recommended vaccines:
    • Pneumococcal – the cause of many cases of pneumonia
    • DTaP – diphtheria – an upper respiratory illness; tetanus – a nervous system infection also known as "lockjaw;" and pertussis – whooping cough
    • Hib – a bacterial infection that can affect blood, nervous system, lungs, joints and the heart
    • Polio – also known as childhood paralysis
    • Rotavirus (oral medication) – an intestinal infection causing severe diarrhea
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • sleep (more sleep at night – though not all at once, two or three naps during the day)
    • eating (every 2-3 hours)
    • diapers (still several wet and at least one dirty per day)
    • head control, smiling, cooing

4 Months

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Second round of recommended vaccines:
    • Pneumococcal – the cause of many cases of pneumonia
    • DTaP – diphtheria – an upper respiratory illness; tetanus – a nervous system infection also known as "lockjaw;" and pertussis – whooping cough
    • Hib – a bacterial infection that can affect blood, nervous system, lungs, joints and the heart
    • Polio – also known as childhood paralysis
    • Rotavirus (oral medication) – an intestinal infection causing severe diarrhea
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • sleep (more sleep at night – though not all at once, two or three naps during the day)
    • eating (may show an interest in solids)
    • diapers (one to two bowel movements per day)
    • increased head control, ‘mini push up,’ beginning to roll over, sitting up with support

6 Months

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Additional vaccines:
    • Pneumococcal – the cause of many cases of pneumonia
    • DTaP – diphtheria – an upper respiratory illness; tetanus – a nervous system infection also known as ‘lockjaw;’ and pertussis – whooping cough
    • Hib – a bacterial infection that can affect blood, nervous system, lungs, joints and the heart
    • Rotavirus (oral medication) – an intestinal infection causing severe diarrhea
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • sleep (up to 11 hours per night, up to 4 hours during the day)
    • eating (beginning solids, starting with rice cereal)
    • diapers (still several wet and at least one dirty per day)
    • teething (first teeth, front incisors, may begin to come in at this time)
    • better head control, rolling over, sitting up, grabbing or reaching for objects.

9 Months

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Assess for anemia
  • Any missed vaccines will be administered at this time
    • Hepatitis B – a serious liver infection
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • sleep (up to 11 hours per night, up to 4 hours during the day)
    • eating (introduction of finger foods, vitamins if necessary)
    • pulling up; standing (on own or assisted); crawling, scooting or slithering, baby babble, listens and responds to own name, pointing at objects, thumb and forefinger grab, poking at objects

12 Months

  • Baby’s height, weight and head circumference will be measured
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Assess for anemia
  • Vaccines given for:
    • Pneumococcal – the cause of many cases of pneumonia
    • Varicella – chickenpox
  • Discussion of baby’s development, including:
    • Eating (switching to whole cow’s milk from formula, deciding on extended breastfeeding)
    • Evaluation of diet, sleep schedules, dental health and other general health issues.
    • pulling up, standing, crawling, first steps, first words, emergence of personality traits
    • Use of spoon, mastering drinking from a ‘sippy’ cup
    • Separation anxiety and/or ‘shyness’ is common at this age
    • First words

15 Months

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Complete physical examination
  • Any missed vaccinations will be administered at this time
    • MMR – measles – a serious respiratory infection with high fever and often a rash; mumps – a painful glandular infection; rubella – another serious respiratory infection with fever and rash
    • Hib – a bacterial infection that can affect blood, nervous system, lungs, joints and the heart
  • Possible screenings for anemia and/or lead exposure
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Eating (appetite often decreases at this age although child should still eat three meals a day and two to three healthy snacks)
    • Mobility (now that child is beginning to walk more frequently, injury prevention and childproofing are necessary)
    • Discussion of readiness for forward-facing car seat
    • Emotions become more apparent. Tantrums are common at this age.
    • Expanding vocabulary

18 Months

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Any missed vaccines will be administered
    • DTaP – diphtheria – an upper respiratory illness; tetanus – a nervous system infection also known as "lockjaw;"’ and pertussis – whooping cough
    • Polio – also known as childhood paralysis
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Eating (importance of a healthy, balanced diet)
    • Ability to respond to simple directions
    • Ability to form simple two-word sentences
    • Potential readiness for toilet training

24-Months/2 Years

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Eyesight and hearing evaluated
  • Assess for anemia
  • Any missed vaccines will be administered at this time in addition to a second dose of the vaccine for Hepatitis A – a serious liver infection
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Eating (continued importance of a healthy, balanced diet)
    • Ability to respond to two-step directions
    • Ability to understand "concepts" such as discipline and time
    • Progress towards toilet training
    • Expanded vocabulary, ability to ask questions such as "why?"

3 Years

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Thorough eye examination
  • Blood pressure measured
  • Any new or missed vaccines will be administered at this time
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Handling emotions positively (not hitting, pushing or biting others)
    • Showing the beginnings of left- or right-hand dominance
    • Sleeping (nightmares or fear of the dark is common at this age)
    • Progress towards or mastery of toilet training
    • Playing pretend, coloring, playing well with others

4 Years

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Blood pressure measured
  • Hearing exam administered
  • Assessment of language development
  • Evaluation of dental health
  • Any missed vaccines will be administered at this time
  • Booster vaccines given for start of school, including
    • DTaP – diphtheria – an upper respiratory illness; tetanus – a nervous system infection also known as ‘lockjaw;’ and pertussis – whooping cough
    • Polio – also known as childhood paralysis
    • MMR – measles – a serious respiratory infection with high fever and often a rash; mumps – a painful glandular infection; rubella – another serious respiratory infection with fever and rash
    • Varicella – chickenpox
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Ability to participate in a two-way conversation with family
    • Mastering complex motor skills (such as riding a tricycle or bicycle)
    • Mastery of toilet training
    • Readiness or active participation in reading, writing and counting activities

5 Years

  • Child’s general growth measured and evaluated
  • Blood pressure measured
  • Blood sample taken (to test for iron and other levels)
  • Urine sample taken (to check for blood sugar levels)
  • Test for tuberculosis
  • Vision and hearing tests administered
  • Complete physical examination
  • All vaccines necessary to begin school will be administered at this time if they have not been already
  • Discussion of child’s development, including:
    • Forming friendships with other children
    • Ability to remember address and phone number
    • Ability to follow three- or four-step instructions
    • Asserting independence (through favorite clothes, books or songs)
    • Brushing teeth and/or bathing on his or her own
    • Readiness or active participation in reading, writing and counting activities

6 Years and Older

  • Yearly visits will consist of weight/height measurement, blood pressure, hearing/vision exam, catch up on any necessary vaccines or boosters, evaluation of social skills
  • Specific health concerns will be addressed at request
  • This is the best time to schedule any necessary physicals for sports or other after-school activities

Vaccine Info




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MIAMI/FT. LAUDERDALE pediatrician MIAMI/FT. LAUDERDALE pediatrician

Phone: +1 954-581-3100
E-mail: info@worldwidepediatrics.com
Pediatric Society © 2015

PLEASE BE ADVISED: All information is provided here for informational purposes only.
It is not intended to, nor should it replace the opinion of a trusted medical professional